My Top Twitter Followers

My top Twitter followers of 200 according to http://mytopfollowersin2010.com

Twitter followersThis site gives you the option of tweeting a list of your top followers, which I did. The tweet it generated was:

My Top Followers in 2010: @socaustgen @judyqld @insidehistory @caroleriley @journeyjottings. Find yours @ http://mytopfollowersin2010.com

Perhaps I misunderstood what’s going on here, but the followers listed do not correspond to the top followers on the list. I apologise to those of you who were missed.

Weather

I don’t think this is the post time I’ve been moved to write about the weather. I suspect that many of our ancestors constantly had an eye on the weather, especially those on the land.

In the old days we had to just wait and hope. Then we could read a forecast in the daily or weekly newspaper. Now we can look at the radar images online.

This is what’s coming my way right now:

Australian Bureau of Meteorology Radar image

I’m in Hornsby, a small dot in the centre. The storm is coming from the south-west to the north-east – right towards me.

It’s coming, and it’s getting loud!

Unlock The Past History and Genealogy Sydney Roadshow Day 1

I had a great time at the Unlock The Past History and Genealogy Sydney Roadshow today.

I saw two of the three talks given by Dan Lynch, author of Google Your Family Tree, and learned some things I didn’t know before, or had forgotten. I hadn’t been able to justify buying the book until today, and Dan was kind enough to sign it for me. I’m a fan!

I also saw both talks by Louis St Denis from Canada. Louis is Director of the National Institute of Genealogical Studies, a  supplier of online genealogical education. She spoke first about genealogical education and second about citing sources, which is an important topic we don’t see very often in this conference context. Despite the fact that Dan was speaking in the other room there was a pleasing number chose to listen to Louise.

Elaine Collins spoke about FindMyPast UK and Rosemary Kopittke spoke about FindMyPast Australasia, both showing us the riches to be found within these sites.  FindMyPast Australasia has an enormous amount of Australian and New Zealand material, all fully searchable, and you can try it out for 24 hours for free without giving your credit card details.

I had some serious fun tweeting about what I saw and heard; you can see my tweets here. I’ll be back there again tomorrow and I’ll try to see some different talks. The Twitter tag is #HGRS10.