My Top Twitter Followers

My top Twitter followers of 200 according to http://mytopfollowersin2010.com

Twitter followersThis site gives you the option of tweeting a list of your top followers, which I did. The tweet it generated was:

My Top Followers in 2010: @socaustgen @judyqld @insidehistory @caroleriley @journeyjottings. Find yours @ http://mytopfollowersin2010.com

Perhaps I misunderstood what’s going on here, but the followers listed do not correspond to the top followers on the list. I apologise to those of you who were missed.

A good reason to write a blog

Blog posts are a snapshot in time. Just as a photograph can tell you a lot about someone, so can a blog post, even when they talk about seemingly trivial things. Even memes, those things that seem to go around like a craze in primary school, can be meaningful.

I have been sorting through old drafts that were never published, and I found this one from October 2008:

Ten years ago I was:

  1. Working on the implementation of a new computer system to prepare for Y2K
  2. Sharing our new house with my sister’s family until theirs was ready to move into
  3. Wondering how long my mother’s new marriage would last (not long)
  4. Planting Australian natives in the garden
  5. Spending too much money

Five things on today’s to-do list:

  1. Give the cat his antibiotics (done)
  2. Call my Dad to see how my step-mother is doing (trying)
  3. Go and see my step-mother in hospital
  4. Meet an old friend for lunch (will do)
  5. Do some neglected housework (not done)

Five snacks I enjoy:

  1. My sister’s brownies
  2. Yoghurt
  3. A banana, or some grapes
  4. dry-roasted cashews
  5. Did I mention my sister’s brownies?

Five places I have lived (in no particular order):

  1. Beautiful leafy Hornsby in Sydney’s northern suburbs (for the last 20-odd years)
  2. Dubbo in Central Western New South Wales (where I grew up)
  3. A flat in Rockdale in Sydney’s south (while I was at uni)
  4. A semi-detached house in inner-city Stanmore (when I was finishing uni and starting work)
  5. Suva, Fiji (for about 6 months when I was 12)

Five jobs I have had:

  1. Salesgirl at Woolworths Variety when I was 14 or 15
  2. Sales assistant at Angus and Robertson book store in Dubbo between school and uni
  3. Bar attendant at a couple of southern Sydney pubs while I was at uni
  4. Clerk for the Department of Immigration and Ethnic Affairs for a couple of years when I finished uni
  5. Computer programmer at the gas company

Five places I would like to visit:

  1. Ireland – Northern Ireland and the Republic
  2. The National Archives of Fiji
  3. Namibia (again)

None of this will have any significance for anyone outside of my family, I suspect. For my close family, however, it may mean a great deal. Not only does it say to anyone who is interested some details of my past and present life, but it has some bearing on other events that had great significance.

I suspect that I didn’t finish the post because of what was going on at the time. I did talk to my Dad about how my step-mother was doing, and I went to see her in hospital every day and sat with her while my sister, her daughter, raced home to get things done. We moved her home when the hospital could no longer do anything for her, and after a few days she passed away, in her own bed with her family around her. Only 11 days after I wrote this.

It still hurts that she was taken so soon. 60 is young, these days. Her father lived much, much longer.

I also remember meeting the old friend for lunch. He told me a trick to do with parking near the hospital before the afternoon peak hour.

It was a shock to read through this post after all this time. I thought I would share it with my family, and anyone else who is interested.

Adi, Christmas 2007

Unlock The Past History and Genealogy Sydney Roadshow Day 1

I had a great time at the Unlock The Past History and Genealogy Sydney Roadshow today.

I saw two of the three talks given by Dan Lynch, author of Google Your Family Tree, and learned some things I didn’t know before, or had forgotten. I hadn’t been able to justify buying the book until today, and Dan was kind enough to sign it for me. I’m a fan!

I also saw both talks by Louis St Denis from Canada. Louis is Director of the National Institute of Genealogical Studies, a  supplier of online genealogical education. She spoke first about genealogical education and second about citing sources, which is an important topic we don’t see very often in this conference context. Despite the fact that Dan was speaking in the other room there was a pleasing number chose to listen to Louise.

Elaine Collins spoke about FindMyPast UK and Rosemary Kopittke spoke about FindMyPast Australasia, both showing us the riches to be found within these sites.  FindMyPast Australasia has an enormous amount of Australian and New Zealand material, all fully searchable, and you can try it out for 24 hours for free without giving your credit card details.

I had some serious fun tweeting about what I saw and heard; you can see my tweets here. I’ll be back there again tomorrow and I’ll try to see some different talks. The Twitter tag is #HGRS10.